You can use the excellent Opentrack software to enable EDTracker in any game that supports the TrackIR or Freetrack protocols. This is useful if a game does not support direct joystick input for head look.

Please note the below instructions are provided "as-is"; we are not responsible for the Opentrack software and cannot help with individual queries on Opentrack operation or support.

Step 1 - Configure EDTracker Pro

The first important step is to configure your EDTracker Pro into linear mode, with 1:1 scaling. Using the EDTracker GUI software, change the axis scaling settings to 1.00 and ensure the scaling method "linear" is selected. If you use smoothing to reduce head wobble and sensitivity, set it to a value you prefer - otherwise set Smoothing to 0 to disable. Once set, you can minimise the UI (or even close it, if you don't want to use any of the hot-key functionality).

Step 2 - Launch Opentrack

Download and launch Opentrack. Select "Joystick Input" as the input device, and choose "Freetrack 2.0 Enhanced" for the output. You can optionally select and configure a filter if you wish - this will help smooth out any small "jitters" if you experience them. One important note : if using a filter within Opentrack, we advise disabling smoothing in the EDTracker GUI (see previous step).

Step 3 - Configure Input Device

Click the small hammer next to "Joystick Input". On the subsequent screen, select your EDTracker Pro device in the top drop-down, and then select Joystick Axes for yaw, pitch and roll. Pay attention to the axis numbers in the diagram below!

 

Click OK when done.

Step 4 - Configure Output Device

Click the small hammer next to "freetrack 2.0 enhanced". On the subsequent screen, select "Use TrackIR, hide FreeTrack". This is generally what we advise, however if you have a game that insists on the FreeTrack protocol, choose "Use FreeTrack, hide TrackIR" instead. We find the first option tends to work for 99% of the games we've tried.

Click OK when done.

Step 5 - Set Output Options

Click the Options button on the main Opentrack window. On the subsequent window, disable Translation Compensation and then map the Destination<->Source settings as per the image below :

NOTE: The lower 3 mappings for X/Y/Z are only necessary if you wish to set up "pseudo-6DOF", allowing you to slide your head sideways in-game by using head roll to the left and right (for example, to look "around" obstacles in front of you).

Click OK when done.

Step 6 - Set up your curves

Click the Mapping button in the main Opentrack window. There are tabs for each axis. This configuration is very much down to personal preference. These tabs allow you to change how much in-game movement is registered - you can increase or decrease the level of output for a given amount of input. Take the following image as an example :-

 

Along the bottom of the graph are numbers 0 to 180 - these represent the degrees of rotation for your real-world head.

Along the left edge of the graph is a similar scale, but this represents the degrees of rotation of your virtual (in-game) head.

In the example above, we have a linear mapping that equates just over 30 degrees of real-world head movement to a full 180 degrees of movement in the game. So we can look completely behind us in-game by only turning our head about 30 degrees to the left or right.

Click to add or move points in the graph - there is no "right" or "wrong" here - it's whatever you are comfortable with. If you want to see your head movement represented "live" while you adjust, click the "Start" button back in the main Opentrack window first.

Step 6B - Pseudo-6DOF (Optional)

A common complaint with 3DOF-only devices like EDTracker is that they don't provide the player the ability to slide his head left or right. While this is true, there are ways to simulate the effect by using the roll of your head left and right to effect the same thing. This feel entirely natural because most people tend to tilt their head sideways to look around things anyway, rather than keeping their head flat and level, and "sliding" sideways. You can also move your virtual head downwards when you look down, for example to examine cockpit controls closely, and even zoom your view at the same time. We call this "pseudo-6DOF"; there's a video that explains how it works if you're not following! If you wish to use this approach, ensure you have paid attention in Step 5 above, then set up the X, Y and Z axes as follows.

X Axis - slide on roll

On the X tab, set it up similar to the following diagram. With your X axis mapped to head roll in step 5 above, this will sense your head tilting to the left or right (roll) and slide your head sideways instead! The effect is quite useful.

Y Axis - duck as you look down

If you wish, you can make your in-game head move downwards towards your lap when you tilt your head down. This is sometimes useful for examining cockpit controls in flight simulators.

On the Y tab, set it up similar to the following diagram. Make sure you tick the "Asymmetric mapping" radio button, then define the curve in the bottom graph, not the top! Some fine tuning in-game, to your preferences, is to be expected.

Z Axis - zoom in as you look down

If you wish, you can make your in-game head move forwards when you tilt your head down. This is sometimes useful for examining cockpit controls in flight simulators.

On the Z tab, set it up similar to the following diagram. Make sure you tick the "Asymmetric mapping" radio button, then define the curve in the bottom graph, not the top! Some fine tuning in-game, to your preferences, is to be expected.

Step 7 - Don't forget the Start button!

That's it, you're all done! One thing to remember with Opentrack is that it won't start head tracking until you press the Start button! Once started, you should be able to launch any game supporting the protocol you have chosen, and enjoy head tracking.

 

 

 

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Driver-less

Driver-less design with some simple software to do initial setup and calibration.

Robust

Just a straight-forward, sturdy plastic box to attach to your headset. No spindly arms to snap off.

Complete

We don't hide additional requirements - you don't need cameras or any other hardware, so what you buy is everything you need to get going

Responsive

Our MEMS approach gives incredibly fast, responsive monitoring of head movement over traditional point-tracking methods

Simple

EDTracker gets you the basics of 3 degrees-of-freedom head tracking as a virtual joystick.

No Cameras

EDTracker doesn't care about lighting, reflections, backlit rooms, infra red or whether you wear glasses or not!